Tag Archives: species

Animated evolution – Stated Clearly by Jon Perry

Sunday was the anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species (first published on 24th November 1859 – you can find his collected works here), so it’s a perfect time to talk about evolution. Evolution can be a difficult … Continue reading

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Hello nightmares – why scorpions glow in the dark

I’m pretty sure that almost no-one loves scorpions – they’re not far behind spiders in the ‘primal nightmare’ stakes, given the whole scuttling thing and the poisonous sting. But they are fascinating for at least one reason: they glow under … Continue reading

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Mimicry and warning in the insect world

Taking a break from the wonderful world of octopods, but still within the “amazing creatures” realm, I’d like to introduce you to some interesting mimicry and other colouration in the insect world. Many insects can’t credibly threaten most predators, so … Continue reading

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More strange octopods

I’ve been off for a week with bronchitis, curled up at home coughing violently and generally feeling sorry for myself, so apologies for the posting hiatus. Normal service will now be resumed, and with one of my favourite topics – … Continue reading

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Biologist finds potential new species – up his own nose

Yes, you read that right. Professor Tony Goldberg, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, returned from a research trip to Africa to discover ‘an arachnid stowaway‘ in his nasal cavity. Turned out to be a tick (rather an unpleasant creature to … Continue reading

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Orca society

I’ve got a lot of respect for orcas (sometimes called killer whales): they’re intelligent, showing an ability to learn, solve problems, and teaching learned behaviour; they have a complex and stable communication system; and they’ve been observed exhibiting playful behaviour … Continue reading

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Lair of the white worm

If you don’t like the idea of 10-foot long aquatic killer worms, then read no further. The worms in question are called Bobbit worms, iridescent, and quite pretty. So far, all fine and dandy. But these aquatic worms, while on … Continue reading

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World octopus day!

How could I have missed this one? Yesterday was World Octopus Day, so here’s an infographic about these amazing creatures, and, in an amazing example of tool use, a quick video of an octopus collecting halves of coconut shells to use … Continue reading

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Sixty new species discovered in Suriname

Scientists spent three weeks in the rainforest of Suriname and found no less than 60 new species, a few of which may even be new genera, and saw an encouraging total of 1378 species: evidence that this area is one … Continue reading

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Australian biodiversity

It’s still world biodiversity month, and that’s an opportune time to mention a few interesting and little-known facts about biodiversity in Australia. Australia is one of 17 recognised ‘megadiverse’ countries: that is, countries containing extremely high biodiversity. Australia also has … Continue reading

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